CB1 – the new city quarter for Cambridge

cb1-illustration-history

History

When Cambridge Railway Station opened in the 1840s, it brought a new era of industry to the city. Since then, the historic land and buildings surrounding Cambridge Railway Station have witnessed extraordinary change.

But the demise of local enterprises such as the flour mill meant, in recent years, the area had become neglected. Today, its transformation from an unused, derelict site to a prosperous community is almost complete. CB1 is an attractive gateway to Cambridge, a hub for businesses and an appealing place to live, stay, shop and eat.

But we’re not quite finished yet, so here’s the story so far:

1845-2001

1845 – 2001

Cambridge Station, which opened in 1845, had its heyday as a goods yard when Foster’s Mill was built in 1896. Later owned by Spillers Ltd, and eventually Rank Hovis, the site was vacated for development in 2001.

2010

The site was purchased and cleared for demolition. The CB1 development plan aimed to retain the Mill almost in its entirety, but a fire destroyed a significant part of the building. The development was redesigned to accommodate the remaining part of the building, conserving as many features as possible.

2010
2011

2011

Anglia Ruskin University students were offered an opportunity to explore the new student accommodation.

Meanwhile, Costa Coffee and The Co-operative Food moved into the retail outlets.

2012

Microsoft Research occupied the first of the office buildings at 21 Station Road. The building boasts many high-tech features including engineered shades and high-performance glass to minimise solar gain. It also contains a state-of-the-art lecture theatre.

2012
2013

2013

Artist David Ward staged a temporary light installation using the Mill as a backdrop. ‘Foster’s Mill Firmament' was the first project presented as part of the CB1 public art programme.

Shortly after, the building was enclosed in a full-size printed graphic that shrouded the scaffolding and presented an image of the building to be.

2013 – 2014

Four residential pavilion buildings, ‘The Ceres Apartments,’ which comprise 331 units, were built around a terraced ‘pocket’ park.

2013-2014
2015

2015

22 Station Road, a 68,400 square foot, five-floor office building, was fully let within weeks of completion. The building is now home to the likes of engineering company Mott MacDonald and law firm Birketts.

2016

The railway station interior was completely refurbished with a new ticket office and smart ticket gates, but retains the external Victorian facade.

2016
2017

2017

One Station Square, the landmark address of the CB1 development and now home to the likes of Amazon and Deloitte, opened. Meanwhile, a large part of the square itself opened, and the area’s taxi rank and drop-off facilities became operational.